Indian Warrior Camp

     Five miles northwest of Wise on US 23, opposite Emmett Gibson's store is located the Indian Warriors Camp mentioned in the journal of Colonel Christopher Gist, on his return trip from the Ohio country. He states
in his Journal, that on, Wednesday, April 3, 1751 he came to a small creek (now known as Indian Creek) on which was a large Warriors Camp, that would contain seventy or eighty warriors. Their Captain was the Crane, as I know by his picture of Arms printed on a tree. This was a custom of the Indians and the Chief's Arms on the tree indicated that it was a War and not a hunting party. Gist also states that the warriors were away and that he stayed at the camp until the morning of Saturday, April 6, 1751, when he followed the Indian Trail to the present site of Norton, across Powell Mountain (now known as Indian Creek Ridge) by way of the head of Grassy Fork of the Rocky fork of Guest River.
     It took three days for him to make the trip from the Warrior's Camp to the present site of Norton, traveling twelve miles each day on Saturday, 6th and Sunday 7th, and sixteen miles on Monday 8th, when he
encamped upon a small Laurel Creek (now the present site of Norton).
     Gist does not state in his Journal what tribe he thought the warriors of this camp belonged to, but it is believed that they belonged to the Cherokees from one of the towns in East Tennessee, and that the Crane was some minor or sub-chief, who was leading the party. It is also thought that the Indians used this camp as late as 1788, when James Green and Robert Kilgore were killed at the mouth of Indian Creek by a band of Indians who camped the night before under a cliff about 100 yards up the stream.
     Sources of Information: Gist's Journal, interviewed P. H. Addington, Emmett Gibson and  C. A.
Vance.

The Indian Graveyard on Rocky Fork

Location: Seven miles northwest of Wise, 200 yards south of Rocky Fork and on both sides of the road leading from Big Laurel to the Addington Settlement.

Date: About 1750.

Owners: James Green settled here about 1810. Green sold his uncompleted contract to Joseph Addington who completed the contract and secured deed from George and Benjamin Warder. This was about 1825. Joseph Addington left the land to Henry Hopkins Addington,, his son, at his death, 1892. Addington sold it to Clinchfield Coal Corporation in 1897. This corporation owns it at this time.

Description: This Indian burying ground, as pointed out by Patrick Henry Addington, grandson of Joseph Addington, covers about a half acre on both sides of the newly built road up Rocky Fork. The graves are scattered about over the plot. Six graves have been definitely located. 

History: When James Green settled here he found the graves and showed them to Joseph Addington and others. They were all covered with mounds of loose stones. Just west of the graves in a little bottom are to be found many broken arrowheads which is evidence that this place was once the site of an Indian camp or village. Three years ago while building a new road, workman uncovered a large stone in which had been drilled or worked five deep holes which have the appearance of an old fashion bread tray. Many perfect arrowheads, tomahawks
and other Indian relics have been found near this burying ground.

Source of Information: Patrick H. Addington, Elbert J. Bond and H. I. Horne
 

                                
The Indian Grave on Rocky Fork

LOCATION:    Seven miles Northeast of Wise, 20 yards south of Rocky Fork and on both sides  of the road leading to Big Laurel, the Addington Settlement.

Dates: Nov 1, 1750

OWNER:     James Greer settled there about 1810.  Green sold his uncompleted contracts to Joseph Addington who completed the contract and deed from George and Benjamin Gardner.  This was about 1825.
     Joseph Addington left the land to Henry Hopkins Addington, his son at his death, 1892.  Addington sold it to Clinchfield Coal Corporation in 1897 at this time.

DESCRIPTION:     This Indian Burying ground as pointed out by Patrick Henry Addington, grandson of Joseph Addington, covering about a half acre on both sides of the newly built road up Rocky Fork.  The graves are scattered about over the plot.  Six graves have been definitely located.

HISTORY:     When James Green settled here he found the graves and showed them to Joseph Addington and others.  They are covered with local rocks(?)  Just west of the graves in a little bottom are to be found many rare arrowheads which is evidence that this place was once the site of an Indian camp or village.
     Three years ago while building a new road, workmen uncovered alarge              (?) In which has been drilled or worked five dozen (?) holes which have the              (?) Of an old fashioned Rest Tray (?).   Many            (?) Acre                   and these Indian relics have been found near this burying ground.

Source of  Information: Patrick H. Addington, Albert J. Bond and H. I. Horne  
 

 Indian Grave at Big Laurel
 

Location: On a hill overlooking state road No. 626, about 200 yards west of the road and about one-half mile north of Big Laurel Post Office.

Date: Prior to 1800

Owners: Benjamin and George Warder sold to Charles Addington, about 1830. Charles Addington to Johnson Kilgore about 1875. Kilgore left it to his heirs who sold to John Hensley about 1910. John Hensley present owner.

Description: No marker, save mound of rough stones.

History: This Indian grave is genuine. It was discovered accidentally by Mrs. John Hensley about 1915. While piling rocks on a piece of new ground she found that the stones at this place had been used to fill an opening. She kept on taking rocks from it until she found a number of arrowheads. Then she reported the find and Dr. J. M. Hill came and excavated the place and discovered a tomahawk and other Indian relics. He has these in his collection at Wise. Dr. Hill dug at other places on this hill, but failed to find any other signs of graves.

Source of Information: Mrs. John Hensley and Dr. J. M. Hill


 
 
 
 
Return to Wise
Return to Articles

 
 
Copyright Notice
All files on this site are copyrighted by their creator. They may not be reproduced on another site without specific permission from Vickie Sturgill Stevens . Although public information is not in and of itself copyrightable, the format in which they are presented, the notes and comments, etc., are.